Martha Graham and her Heritage

Lloyd Knight and opening night guest artist, ABT's Misty Copeland in At Summer's Full, a rendition of elements from Graham's Letter to the World. Photo: Yi-Chun Wu

The Martha Graham Dance Company brings new and old works to the Joyce. I only recently realized that Martha Graham must have been choreographing her evening-length Clytemnestra and Embattled Garden at more or less the same time. Both premiered during her company’s 1958 season. Perhaps she needed a respite from the marital quarrels, passions, and jealousies that precipitated the Trojan War. … [Read more...]

Foot Music

Michelle Dorrance in ETM: The Initial Approach. Behind her: Demi Remick and Caleb Teicher. Photo: Christopher Duggan

Dorrance Dance taps out a world premiere at Jacob's Pillow July 16 through 27. These days, we’re all wired. Or wirelessly connected. Sometimes walking down the street, I play a private game called “What would Mozart think?” Would he, for instance, worry that people walking along the street with things in their ears, talking loudly into the air, were lunatics? On the other hand, would he get … [Read more...]

Worlds Apart

L to R: Olivia Ancona, Gon Biran, Rebecca Hytting, Douglas Letheren, and (half-hidden) Rachael Osborne in House. Photo: Christopher Duggan

L-E-V from Israel and Dorrance Dance debut at Jacob’s Pillow, July 24-28. Who are these creatures emerging from smoky dimness? Ghosts? Robots?  Ghosts of robots?  They can move in tiny jerks or so fluidly that they appear boneless—pale, androgynous, undulating figures assembling for. . .what? Viewed from another perspective, they are the stunning members of L-E-V, a dance company founded … [Read more...]

Oh Those Feet!

(L to R): Gene Shields, Noellia Garcia Carmena, and Shamar Rooks of the New Ballet Ensemble and School. Photo: Nicolette Overton

Silence doesn’t play a large role in Michelle Dorrance’s SOUNDspace. In the Danspace performances of Dorrance Dance/New York, the choreographer treats St. Mark’s Church as an acoustic instrument, and the building is happy to comply. Back in 1795, when its cornerstone was laid, ministers had no microphones, and the voices of parishioners hymning their lungs out could make it seem as if the high … [Read more...]