ArtsJournal Classic (Text)

AJ Four Ways:
Full View (by category) | Text Only (by date) | Text (by category)headlines only

 

  • Dance

    Iran Sentences Dancers To Being Lashed

    Six Iranians arrested for appearing in a video dancing to Pharrell Williams’ song Happy have been sentenced to up to one year in prison and 91 lashes, their lawyer says.

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    Why An Old(er) Lady Dances

    “I may not kick or jump as high as I used to, but I am a trained dancer with body movement memory, a sense of rhythm, an ability to get every routine and never miss a beat. Besides, I have a hell of a time doing it.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    ABT Launches YouTube Channel

    “The current videos show interviews with dancers as well as discussions about preperformance rituals, competition in the ballet world and the need for perseverance in a dancer’s career. There are also behind-the-scenes glimpses of company classes and rehearsals.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    Misty Copeland’s Long, Strange Journey

    “Copeland’s proceeding along a kind of inevitable music-box destiny, but her path to becoming a star ballerina has been as dramatic, unlikely, and hinged on coincidence as the plots of most ballets – the ones that have plots, anyway.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    More Dance

  • Ideas

    Is Local The New Digital?

    “There are still cases when I want to physically experience a product before I buy it, since the product is not standardized. I want to feel and test it. My decision as to whether to buy it or not depends on the feel of it and on a conversation with the sales staff that cannot be replaced by or compensated through a return service.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    How Freud And His -Ism Came To Be Ubiquitous

    “Eavesdrop on a conversation and it’s likely that, sooner or later, a concept invented or popularised by the founding father of free association will pop up. Oedipus complex. Denial. Id, ego and super-ego. Libido. Death wishes. Anal retentiveness. … Phallic symbols. Projection. And, of course, Freudian slips.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    How To Dig Yourself Out Of Your Sleep Debt

    “Sleep loss, researchers contend, works kind of like credit. Skip a few hours of sleep, and you’ll be all right, so long as you pay back the ‘debt’ in a timely manner. But when sleepless nights stretch on for weeks, or months, your sleep debt starts to accumulate.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    Innovation or Invention?

    “What is the difference? For me, innovation requires a radical new understanding of some basic questions of your craft. On the other hand, incremental invention only extends what you already know.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    More Ideas

  • Issues

    College Football Attendance Is Declining (Sound Familiar?)

    “Student attendance at major college football games is declining across the country. By how much varies greatly at each institution, but a recent Wall Street Journal analysis of turnstile data at 50 public colleges with top football programs found that average student attendance is down more than 7 percent since 2009.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    Steven J Tepper: Have Our Cultural Experiences Focused Too Much On The “Me”?

    “Me experiences” are different from “bigger-than-me experiences.” Me experiences are about voice; they help students express themselves. The underlying question they begin with is, “What do I have to say?” BTM experiences are about insight; they start with, “What don’t I know?” Voice comes after reflection.

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    Censorship! (Alas, It’s All Too Easy To Cry Foul)

    “If the concept of censorship is extended to everything, it means nothing. It should not be trivialized.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    Philadelphia Loses 10,000 Maurice Sendak Items (Here’s What’s Really Being Lost)

    “Leaders from the Rosenbach and the Free Library of Philadelphia – the two merged in 2013 – are not surprised to see the Sendak material leaving. In visits with him in his last years, Rosenbach staffers heard him talk more and more about a museum and study center devoted to his life and work.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    More Issues

  • Media

    Shonda Rhimes Takes Down NYTimes TV Critic For Offensive Article

    Shonda Rhimes had little patience on Friday for the way the television critic of the New York Times wrote about her and her shows.

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    Upping The Ante: California Increases Its Film Tax Credits To Save Productions

    “The law, which takes effect next year, increases the annual film and TV tax credit offered by California and eliminates a selection process producers complained is arbitrary and flawed. Advocates say the new law is crucial to preventing other states and countries from continuing to lure away film and TV production by offering their own lucrative incentives.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    Bill Moyers Retires Again (He Really Means It This Time)

    “Bill Moyers has notified public television stations that his weekly series Moyers & Company will end after the Jan. 2 program. He made a similar announcement last October, but changed his mind in the face of an outpouring of support from his fans on social media. This time, however, “it’s the real deal’.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    Why Net Neutrality Is Important For Artists And Arts Organizations

    “Net neutrality is about how access to our society’s living archive should be governed. Do we want monied interests to be making that decision, or us, the users? The value of the web is how easy it is to share with anyone what we make; whether it’s a business, an artwork, or academic research.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    Edinburgh Int’l Film Fest Suddenly Needs A New Artistic Director

    “The departure of Chris Fujiwara has left the event facing a race against time to find a replacement after the Japanese-American author and critic decided to leave with another year left on his contract.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    More Media

  • Music

    Atlanta Symphony Lockout: Donald Runnicles Speaks (Very) Frankly

    “The lockout is essentially the board and management punishing the orchestra … It’s a one-sided attempt to force the orchestra to its collective knees. It also paints the orchestra as this intransigent group of musicians. But in fact they have shown extraordinary willingness to come to a common agreement, as what happened two years ago proves.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    Labor War Over, Met Opera’s Army Mobilizes For Opening Night

    “The Met is an enormous operation – more than 1,500 people go to work there some days – and the weeks before opening night are among the busiest of the year. … A day spent backstage at the Met this week as the company prepared for its opening night on Monday provided a snapshot of the work, care and expense that go into putting on opera.” (includes video)

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    San Antonio’s New Opera Company Debuts In What Was Once “An Opera Town”

    “Success. Happiness. Disappointment. Ruination. Renewed hope. Those ingredients help turn opera plots. They also could apply to the history of opera in San Antonio, which has experienced cycles of lavish success punctuated by periods of dwindling audiences, inactivity followed by revived interest.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    America’s First LGBT Jazz Festival Has Begun

    Jazz has generally been thought to be a somewhat homophobic field, notwithstanding such great musicians as Cecil Taylor, Billy Strayhorn, and Fred Hersch – who is a headliner at the inaugural OutBeat festival this weekend in Philadelphia.

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    Danish Radio Disbands Its Chamber Orchestra

    “Denmark’s state broadcaster DR announced yesterday that budget cuts would see its chamber orchestra close in January. DR’s Danish National Chamber Orchestra or ‘Underholdningsorkestret’ – previously known as the Danish Radio Sinfonietta – will cease playing in January though it would appear DR’s symphony orchestra will remain unaffected.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    More Music

  • People

    Wonder Woman – And The Man Who Created Her

    “It isn’t only that Wonder Woman’s backstory is taken from feminist utopian fiction. It’s that, in creating Wonder Woman, William Moulton Marston was profoundly influenced by early-twentieth-century suffragists, feminists, and birth-control advocates and that, shockingly, Wonder Woman was inspired by Margaret Sanger, who, hidden from the world, was a member of Marston’s family.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    Ai WeiWei’s Dissident Prison (Alcatraz)

    “Given Mr. Ai’s sharp critiques of the Chinese government and the tireless campaigning for freedom of expression that led to his own imprisonment in 2011, he could have included himself in the group portrait. He did not.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    Alison Bechdel’s Excellent, Wonderful Year

    She got a fellowship to an artists’ retreat in Italy; the play based on her memoir Fun Home won rafts of award nominations, was a Pulitzer finalist, and became a minor cause célèbre in South Carolina; the “Bechdel test” became common currency in movie circles – and then she got a MacArthur award. (includes video)

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    Meet This Year’s MacArthur Genius Arts Recipients

    There are six of them…

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    More People

  • Theatre

    Ivo Van Hove Rebuilds An Entire Theater For His Latest Production

    For his stage adaptation of Ingmar Bergman’s Scenes from a Marriage, the director basically tore out the insides of New York Theater Workshop and turned the space into three separate rooms, each holding 60 people, which get recombined into an amphitheater.

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    If Theatre Is Going To Be Relevant, It Needs Better Technology

    “We need technology to be fully focused on how to improve the live experience. Like: Get me to my seat faster, make the actors more excited, give me stuff that makes being in the venue better. I don’t think live events are going anywhere. I’ve doubled down. This is my business and my life, but we’re becoming irrelevant because we have to figure out how to remain relevant in peoples’ lives. And technology is a part of that.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    What Makes Good Acting? (It’s Not Objective)

    “If anyone tells you there are objective standards, they’re full of crap. This is a matter of personal taste. There are trends. There are many people who loved Philip Seymour Hoffman’s acting. But if you don’t, you’re not wrong. At worst, you’re eccentric.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    Who Killed “American Psycho”? Hungry Producers, That’s Who

    “Two veteran Broadway producers helped torpedo an Off Broadway theater’s premiere of the high-profile musical American Psycho and are now in talks to bring it directly to Broadway next fall.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    More Theatre

  • Visual

    Toronto’s Museum Of Contemporary Canadian Art Faces Uncertain Existential Future

    “At the tail end of a predictable process that has seen the forces of culture work merrily along as unintentional gentrification elves, sprucing and preening until their grassroots urban renewal rewarded them with skyrocketing rents and a one-way ticket out, the question hangs as heavily as ever: Culture has been thrust into the role of cure-all for a litany of urban ills, but what happens when culture outlives its curative function?”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    Major Art Fair In Moscow Cancelled (Because Nobody’s Coming)

    “Art Moscow, Russia’s longest-running contemporary art fair, has been canceled this year because of international tensions and a virtually nonexistent local market, its founder and organizer, Vasily Bychkov, has announced.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    “Painting Set Free” – How J.M.W. Turner Made Modern Art Possible

    There’s a story that Mark Rothko, after seeing a Turner exhibition at MoMA in 1966, quipped, “This man Turner, he learned a lot from me.” Alastair Sooke explores what Rothko meant.

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    Researchers: Here’s Why We Care About Original Art Work More Than Reproductions

    A team of scholars led by George Newman of Yale University argues that “art is seen as a physical extension of the self, and imbued with the person’s soul/essence.” That being the case, the researchers write in the journal Topics in Cognitive Science, “the original possesses an essence that cannot be duplicated.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    Museums Should Have A One-Hour Daily Ban On Selfies, Says Arts Council England Chair

    Peter Bazalgette: “I’m completely in favour [of allowing photography in museums]. … Let’s allow it, but let’s have each gallery have an hour a day where it’s like the quiet carriage on the train.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    More Visual

  • Words

    In The Age Of The Internet, Who Needs Footnotes?

    “For a book to be taken seriously, does it have to take us right to the yellowing page of some crumbling edition guarded in the depths of an austere library, if the material could equally well be found through a Google search? Has an element of fetishism perhaps crept into what was once a necessary academic practice?”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    Did Henry James Write YA Fiction?

    “In fact, James is every bit as concerned with innocence recoiling at adulthood … The difference is that James writes about women, instead of wild boys. The archetypal Jamesian character is a young American woman – Daisy Miller, Isabel Archer, Milly Theale, Maggie Verver – whose innocence is manipulated and ultimately destroyed by the forces (usually British or European) of experience.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    “It’s Not Literary” – Why It’s Such A Breakthrough For Alison Bechdel And Roz Chast To Be Getting Book Prizes

    Alexander Chee: “‘I don’t know how to evaluate this.’ ‘Shouldn’t comics have their own category?’ ‘This isn’t literary.’ As a frequent juror on prizes, colonies and fellowships, I am, it could be said, so tired of this, that in fact, I will fight you for Roz Chast’s right to be on this list. I will fight you for the right for Bechdel to get that MacArthur.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    Why You Should Read Alison Bechdel’s Old Comic Strip

    “Just as Armistead Maupin’s Tales of the City series wended its leisurely, funny and warm way through the evolving gay and transgender communities in San Francisco, Dykes to Watch Out For dives deep into a fictional lesbian community, considering the impact of transgender politics, marriage and even the death of independent bookstores on her characters. … Did I mention that the strip is fabulous, funny reading?”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    Canada’s Prestigious Giller Prize Doubles To $140,000

    “Founder Jack Rabinovitch announced Tuesday that the Scotiabank Giller Prize is now worth $140,000. The winner will get $100,000 and the other four finalists $10,000. It represents a doubling of the prize and makes it the highest payout for a literary prize in Canada, richer even than Britain’s Man Booker Prize of 50,000 pounds (about $89,000 Canadian).”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    More Words

Read the story at