ArtsJournal Classic (Text)

AJ Four Ways:
Full View (by category) | Text Only (by date) | Text (by category)headlines only

 

  • Dance

    Seriously, Ballet, What Is Your Deal With Dancers Who Aren’t White?

    “Dancers of color are again supplicants at the gate, begging to be accepted in an art form that literally can’t see us and so will not let us in.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    People Won’t Listen To Scientists ABout Climate Change? Fine, Then Let’s Dance Them To Undertsanding

    “Scientists today believe that such critical information must be disseminated and quickly acted upon to avoid catastrophe. But that is not happening, as indicated by the ‘much talk, little action’ status of climate change. The central need is clearly not for more natural science research (although in many areas it would be very helpful). Rather, the social sciences and humanities need to be reorganized and refocused — ‘rebooted’ — to provide better understanding of human behaviors and how they can be altered.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    How Irish Step Dancing Left Irish Ethnicity Behind

    “When it was whites who made up the majority of U.S. immigrants, it really mattered if you were Irish, Italian, or some other white ethnicity. … Once the distinctions no longer mattered and the stigma of being Irish had faded, then Irish dance could be something anyone did and others would want to do. And, so, now anyone does. The three-time winner of the All-Ireland Dancing Championship in Dublin is a biracial, black, Jewish kid from Ohio.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    The Hot New Dance In New York? A Dance From Jane Austen’s Time

    “Derived from English country dancing—think of the long paired lines of couples crisscrossing and partner-swapping in all those Jane Austen country-manor balls, now press fast forward—contra offers young urbanites an inclusive atmosphere where they can work up a little sweat away from the gym and touch human beings instead of screens.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    More Dance

  • Ideas

    The Coloring Book For Adults That’s Sweeping The World

    “Fan mail poured in from busy professionals and parents who confided to Ms. Basford that they found coloring in her books relaxing. More accolades flowed on social media, as people posted images from their coloring books.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    Would A Telepathy Machine Help Us – Or Should We Work On Empathy Instead?

    “A telepathy machine, if it could ever be built, would undoubtedly have wonderful applications. It could allow people who are immobilised by a stroke or neurological disease to communicate, or create incredible opportunities for artists to collaborate. But it seems unlikely that it could broadcast world peace.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    The London Skyline Campaign Is Trying To Save The Wrong Thing

    “The look of these buildings matters as does the way they fit into existing surroundings, as does their impact on the street environment. But the height of them isn’t what matters most. It’s whether they provide the homes, offices and shops that the city and its people need.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    How Tech Criticism Is Failing Us

    “That radical critique of technology in America has come to a halt is in no way surprising: it could only be as strong as the emancipatory political vision to which it is attached. No vision, no critique. Lacking any idea of how sensors, algorithms, and databanks could be deployed to serve a non-neoliberal agenda, radical technology critics face an unenviable choice.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    More Ideas

  • Issues

    Museums And Galleries Shutter As Yemen’s Political Unrest Turns To War

    “Yemen’s artists, with photography a prominent art form that has produced several significant female photographers, were still working and producing interesting art, curators say. But ‘it is quite a challenge to be an artist in the country.'”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    Will The Tate Give Back A Possibly Looted Constable?

    “Tate Gallery says ‘new information’ has emerged over a John Constable painting in its collection thought to have been stolen by the Nazis. It has asked for a review of a recommendation that it should return the work to the heirs of the original owner.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    Report On UK Creative Industries: Here’s What Needs Doing

    “The welcome emergence of London as possibly the leading creative industry hub in the world has disguised the lack of equivalent growth outside London, and this situation should be addressed by government as a priority,” it concludes.

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    ‘Man-Seders’ – Matzoh With Steak And Scotch

    “Unlike staid practice sessions of old, these promise flowing alcohol, macho food and male bonding along with some religious instruction, although that last one can get a bit lost at some of the events. … The goal is simple: to teach men about the Passover Seder, including how to run one, and engage them more in the Jewish faith.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    More Issues

  • Media

    Britain’s First Cinema Is About To Reopen Its Doors As A Movie Theatre Once Again

    “By 1896, the reputation of the institution was such that the Lumière brothers chose it as the UK venue on a world tour designed to showcase their film projector, the cinematograph.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    ‘Home’ Was Projected To Be A Flop For Dreamworks – But That’s Not What Happened This Weekend

    Never bet against the children: “There is a sea of adult content, and they were able to march right in and take advantage of an enthusiastic and underserved family audience.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    The British Public Apparently Want ‘More Real’ And Older Women On TV

    “The survey found that people want less scantily clad women on reality television shows as well and that audiences did not think that they were good representations of real people.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    On YouTube: A Battle Over Fair Use And Superfans

    “If you’re video maker who’s had a video flagged and you want to dispute it, the process is Kafkaesque. The copyright holder alone decides the outcome: It can uphold its claim. It can agree that your video does not infringe its copyright. Or it can do nothing at all for 30 days, during which time all advertising is suspended. Most likely, your video eventually is returned to you—but by that point, the damage is done.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    CBC: Death By A Million Cuts

    “The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation announced Thursday that it is cutting another 244 jobs over the next six months to save $15-million annually, as part of its five-year plan to eliminate up to 1,500 positions by 2020.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    More Media

  • Music

    How Country Came To Rule The Airwaves

    “It wasn’t inevitable that country music would thrive in the globalized world of perpetual Facebook updates, a world whose frenetic pace can be felt in electronica, or whose nouveau riche aspirations are extolled in hip-hop.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    Russia Fires Opera Director Who Put On Wagner And Pissed Off The Church

    “Russia’s culture minister on Sunday fired the director of a Siberian theater whose modern staging of Wagner’s opera ‘Tannhauser’ offended the powerful Russian Orthodox Church. … ‘Orthodox Christianity is the foundation of the great Russian culture,’ said one of the signs held by the protesters in Novosibirsk.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    San Francisco Symphony Experiments With Another New Way To Bring In A Younger Crowd

    “The series is just four months old, and the symphony has made some unusual marketing choices — like not putting a link to Soundbox on its homepage.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    Strings Dealer Who ‘Kept Poor Records’ Avoids Jail, Pays Back Nearly $400,000

    “Magby continues to operate his Guilford business, and his restoration and repair skills for these types of ultra high-end stringed instruments is world-renowned, Maxwell said.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    Six Seconds In The Studio That Influenced 1500 Songs

    “Spencer retired from music more than 40 years ago and is now a novelist living in North Carolina. Although he was angry when he first heard the Amen break was being sampled, he now feels more at peace with it.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    More Music

  • People

    The Lawyer Who’s Preparing For Courts About, And Maybe In, Space

    “I began to see analogues between the founding of the United States and what we would need to do to go into space. I want to point out very, very strongly that this analogy between the founding of the US and space law is not a call for United States dominance or Manifest Destiny in space.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    An Actor Who Parlayed Her Dance Career Into Serious Movie Roles

    Sally Forrest, who died March 15 at age 86, “began studying dance at an early age and was signed to an MGM contract shortly after graduating from high school. She had several uncredited roles as a dancer before being cast as a woman who has a child out of wedlock in the 1949 drama ‘Not Wanted.'”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    A Chinese-American Artist’s Pastels Inspired The Look Of Walt Disney’s ‘Bambi’

    “Inspired by Chinese landscape paintings, [Tyrus Wong] used watercolor and pastels to make sample sketches that evoked forest scenes with simple strokes of color and special attention to light and shadow. … Wong’s sketches caught Disney’s eye and became the guide for Bambi’s background artists, who were later trained to mimic his style.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    Tomas Tranströmer, 83, Winner Of 2011 Nobel Prize For Literature

    “He wrote in exceptionally pure, cold Swedish without frills. His descriptions of nature were as sparse and alive as a Japanese painting. … His sparse output was highly praised from the moment his first collection, 17 Poems, appeared in 1954 and he was acknowledged as Sweden’s greatest living poet long before he won the Nobel Prize. He was translated into more than 60 languages.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    More People

  • Theatre

    Hilary Mantel’s Notes On How Actors Should Play The Characters Of ‘Wolf Hall’

    For Anne Boleyn: “In your lifetime you are the focus of every lurid story that the imagination of Europe can dream up. From the moment you enter public consciousness, you carry the projections of everyone who is afraid of sex or ashamed of it. You will never be loved by the English people.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    Does Children’s Theatre Damage Young Performers By Keeping Things Too Sweet?

    “The typical demographic of the audience for the young company’s work isn’t enough to educate our young performers about the needs of an audience. How will they ever fulfil their potential as artists and theatre-makers without that understanding?”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    L.A. Actors Definitely At Odds With Each Other Over Equity’s 99-Seat Theatre Plan

    Equity “surveyed its L.A. actors about ‘being a working theater professional in Los Angeles and what it’s like to be an Equity member,’ followed by focus groups and a town hall where members overwhelmingly spoke in favor of reforming, but not eliminating, the longstanding 99-seat plan.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    Carey Perloff: The Big Challenges For American Theatre

    She’s disturbed by the way “many large-scale institutional theaters today have become roadhouses to incubate commercial productions headed for Broadway,” alarmed at the “relative paucity of female voices rising to the top of our profession” and frustrated that funding sources are so heavily focused on new-play development that there is “virtually no support for the training of actors” and not all that much for new approaches to the classics.

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    More Theatre

  • Visual

    Google Is Adding A Mission – Documenting Street Art Before It Disappears

    “Offering the best the street art world has to offer, the Google collection is an obvious boon for fans of the medium and benefits artists by giving them worldwide exposure. But cataloging, quantifying and curating run contrary to the street art ethos adhered to by artists whose ephemeral messages admonish and amuse people around the world.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    Slideshow Of A Home Once Rejected

    “These photos explore what the Chinese-American identity is, a coming-of-age story about the merging of two, sometimes polarizing, cultures. As I used art to understand our place and contributions in the country’s social landscape, I noticed something else.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    The Whitney’s Curators Mount A Big Show In The Museum’s New Renzo Piano Digs Downtown

    “The show they’ve created is not a comprehensive survey of American art history, but rather a thematic look at ‘overlapping narratives,’ says De Salvo, told through a selection from the 22,000 pieces in the Whitney’s wide-ranging collection.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    How Our Understanding Of War-Looted Artwork Is Changing The Art Marketplace

    “There are hundreds of cases out there that are still unsolved. We are only beginning to realise that this was the most gigantic theft, aside from the terrible human loss involved.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    A Planned Skyscraper In The Alps Elicits Furious Response

    “The outsize nature of the structure in the town of just 1,000 permanent residents is matched by the prices tourists will pay: according to The Telegraph, rooms at 7132, as the proposed hotel is called, will run from $1,000 to $24,000 per night.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    More Visual

  • Words

    Penguin’s Little Black Books Hit A Sweet Spot

    “The commercial success of the commute-length gobbets – 80 titles ranging from the Communist Manifesto to Sappho’s poems to Mozart’s letters to his father – is striking since they are all in the public domain.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    When We Read, Our Brains Might Be Seeing All The Words We Know As Images

    “According to a new study, our brain sees words we know like a picture, recognizing whole words, rather than strings of letters that require processing. By tuning neurons to respond to complete words that have been seen before, our brain allows us to read quickly.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    Why Would Anyone Start A New Literary Magazine? (But Then…)

    “Demand isn’t fixed or finite; it has the opportunity to surprise us. In strict consumer terms, people can’t demand what they don’t know about. The introduction of a service​, a product or an idea is what ultimately drives demand. One of the things the LA Review of Books proved was that the demand for smart writing is larger than anyone expected, and what we’ve found in recent weeks is that there does seem to be demand for what we’re supplying.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    The Royal Poet Laureate’s Eulogy For Richard III

    Here’s the text of Carol Ann Duffy’s encomium, which was recited at the funeral by Benedict Cumberbatch.

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    Princeton Review Gives Taylor Swift An “F” For Bad Grammar (But…)

    In a Princeton test paper, a section headed “Grammar in Real Life” told students: “Pop lyrics are a great source of bad grammar. See if you can find the error in each of the following.” Taylor Swift’s song Fifteen was then cited as containing the line “Somebody tells you they love you, you got to believe ’em.” A fan posted her sad reaction online: “I was just having an amazing time studying for the SAT and now I feel attacked.” Then Swift herself responded on Tumblr: “Not the right lyrics at all pssshhhh. You had one job, test people. One job.”

    Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

    More Words

Read the story at