It’s true! It’s true!

As you may have already heard, I’ve won a Bradley Prize. Here’s part of what The Wall Street Journal had to say about it:

We’re delighted to report that our colleague and artistic polymath Terry Teachout has been named one of the winners of the 2014 Bradley Prize.

The Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation, based in Milwaukee, offers the awards each year to as many as four individuals for their distinguished contributions to American institutions, free enterprise and other causes that the late Bradley brothers championed. The recognition comes with a cash prize of $250,000 and will be presented in Washington, D.C., on June 18. Additional winners will be named in the coming weeks.

Our readers know Terry as our drama critic and cultural essayist in his biweekly “Sightings” column. He is also a man of many artistic parts, as a playwright, biographer and opera librettist. “Satchmo at the Waldorf,” his first play, is currently running at New York’s Westside Theatre. His books include “Duke: A Life of Duke Ellington,” “Pops: A Life of Louis Armstrong” and “The Skeptic: A Life of H.L. Mencken.” He received a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2012 and has served on the National Council on the Arts.

“Terry Teachout has distinguished himself, not just as a first-rate journalist, but as a supporter of the arts,” said Michael W. Grebe, president and CEO of the Bradley Foundation. “His work as a biographer and a playwright is critical to advancing and preserving America’s artistic and cultural tradition.”…

Read the whole thing here.

I’m flabbergasted–and humbled. And, yes, it’s true: Mrs. T and I really have decided to use part of the prize money to buy a new toaster. We need one.

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Snapshot: the making of Peter Grimes

From a 1945 British Pathé newsreel, preparations for the premiere of Benjamin Britten’s Peter Grimes:

(This is the latest in a series of arts-related videos that appear in this space each Monday and Wednesday.)

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Almanac: Isaiah Berlin on received opinion

“Isaiah told a long story about the death of the Spanish poet Lope de Vega. Assured that he was now finally at death’s door, de Vega was able to confess one final (for a poet) sacreligious thought: ‘Alors, Dante m’embête’–‘Well, then, Dante bores me.'”
Michael Ignatieff, Isaiah Berlin: A Life

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