Today’s Top AJBlog stories 02.21.14

University of Maryland Blindsided by Corcoran’s Surprise Deal Source: CultureGrrl | Published on 2014-02-21 My Own Secret Drone Program Source: PostClassic | Published on 2014-02-21 Are Artists Really Eccentric?, and Forgetting the Beatles Source: CultureCrash | Published on 2014-02-21 Risk and privilege Source: The Artful Manager | Published on 2014-02-21

Phoenix Symphony Picks A New Music Director

L169_CIFRb7a88426813c6c220a8aa78af6b3db5a

“Tito Muñoz, who currently serves as music director of the Opéra National de Lorraine and Orchestre Symphonique et Lyrique de Nancy in France, will take the baton at Phoenix’s Symphony Hall for seven classics concerts in the 2014-15 season. A native of Queens, N.Y., he is 30 years old — the same age of his […]

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

Brain Scan: How Dog Brains Are Similar To Human Brains

mridogs-inline

“Like humans, dogs appear to possess brain systems that are devoted to making sense of vocal sounds, and are sensitive to their emotional content. These systems have not previously been described in dogs or any non-primate species.”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

The Critics’ “Best Year”? (Maybe It Wasn’t The Best Year For Critics!)

McNulty Oscar Notebook

Rather than single out 2013 as an exceptional year for drama on stage and screen, I posit a different reason for its noteworthiness: It marked the period in which grade inflation by critics became a commonly deployed strategy for dealing with the cultural and economic insecurity that shows no signs of abating in post-recessionary America.

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

A Plan To Find, Recover 20th Century Music Lost Through Repression/Supression

supressed31rv1

Since the Nazis’ concept of “degenerate music” was driven mainly by racial ideology, the works they suppressed cover a wide range of styles, from atonal modernism to idioms influenced by cabaret and jazz. The Soviet notion of “socialist realism” was sufficiently elastic that almost anyone who didn’t pass muster politically could be targeted as an […]

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

One Man’s Quixotic Attempt To Recreate A Vermeer

vermeer-music-lesson23rv1

“What seemed to make this the height of folly was that Tim Jenison, born in 1955, had no training or experience as a painter. Moreover, in Johannes Vermeer, he was embracing an artist whose canvases, for all their immense charm and quotidian content, are among the most complex, difficult and well … mysterious in the […]

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

The Case Of The Illustrator (Who Earned Little) And The Painter (Who Got $5.7 Million)

chris-foss-580

“There is, then, an undercurrent of injustice to the astronomical price of Glenn Brown’s imitation: he has reaped a larger financial reward. Chris Foss must settle for something else: the plain knowledge that he defined and popularized a niche—a noble success, but one that seizes fewer headlines than seven-figure auction prices.”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

Candy Crush: Addictive Game, Incredible Business, Horrible Investment

Candy Crush

Derek Thompson: “Last year the company took in $1.88 billion with $568 million in profits – half $1 billion in profits! To put this in perspective, a mobile gaming company specializing in colored sugar baubles made more than a quarter of Amazon’s lifetime earnings in a year.” But can that possibly last?

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

This Company Wants to Print All of Wikipedia As 1,000 Dead-Tree Books

Wikipedia Books Project

The company PrintPedia, whose product is an app to print Wikipedia content on demand, is trying to raise $50,000 on Indiegogo to produce the complete English-language Wikipedia as a 1,193,014-page, 1,000-volume set of books. Isn’t that completely beside the point? Depends on what exactly the point is.

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

Staging Gay Liberation

Matthew Baldwin, in The Act, written by Thomas Hescott and Matthew Baldwin.

“As two plays set amid the 1960s gay rights movement open in London, their writers, Jon Bradfield and Thomas Hescott, discuss charting gay life before their time and why theatre is a good place to explore oppression.”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

Lisa Gasteen, Back From the Vocal Dead

Lisa Gasteen

Late in the ’00s, the Australian dramatic soprano was going through a vocal crisis so severe that she expected never to sing in public again. Now she’s back at work, thanks to determination, physical therapy and Botox. (She’s lost quite a bit of weight and founded a vocal academy to boot.)

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

Bedtime Stories by the Dear Leader

bedtime with Dear Leader

“North Korea’s leaders are often thought of as ruthless, secretive autocrats but rarely as popular children’s authors. However, between issuing instructions about prison camps and the development of nuclear weapons, Kim Jong-un’s father and grandfather apparently found time to write stories for the young.”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter