Top Posts From AJBlogs 01.29.14

Not Against Interpretation Source: We The Audience | Published on 2014-01-29 Pricing at the Met Source: For What it’s Worth | Published on 2014-01-29 Rothschild Prayerbook Squeezes Out A New Record, Sort Of Source: Real Clear Arts | Published on 2014-01-29 “Dirt Always Wins” — A Story, Part Two Source: Out There | Published on 2014-01-29  

Alain de Botton’s Idea To Fix The News

Newspaper headlines

De Botton thinks news should be more like novels, but what does he think news is? “The determined pursuit of the anomalous,” he writes at one point, before deciding that he wants to leave the definition “deliberately vague”.

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Ticket Pricing Error Hurt Met Opera, Led To Drop In Sales

Facade_of_the_Metropolitan_Opera_House_at_Lincoln_Center,_NYC

“Last February, Met officials announced a reversal of the price increase, acknowledging that their foray into dynamic pricing had had unintended consequences. The financial disclosure, filed as part of the requirements of a $100 million bond offering in 2013, shows average attendance fell to 79% of the opera house’s capacity—even lower than officials projected last […]

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Do We Really Need Commas?

140128_GW_CommaDisappear.jpg.CROP.original-original

You “could take [the commas out of] a great deal of modern American texts and you would probably suffer so little loss of clarity that there could even be a case made for not using commas at all.”

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How Pete Seeger Transformed Pop Music

Pete Seeger Changed Pop

“[He] introduced American pop to a different America: the one outside Tin Pan Alley and Hollywood, where a volunteer gospel choir could sing with more gumption than a studio chorus, and where a decades-old song about hard times could speak directly to the present. The folk revival reminded the pop world that songs could be […]

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Dealer/Hoarder Considers Restitution for Nazi-Looted Art

Gurlitt Matisse

An attorney for Cornelius Gurlitt, the reclusive Munich collector whose trove of art, roughly valued at $1.3 billion, may be works looted by Nazi forces and sold through Gurlitt’s art dealer father, says that he will consider

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Complete Works of Ben Jonson Now Available Online

ben-jonson

“The new Cambridge Edition of the Works of Ben Jonson Online, produced by a team of 30 scholars and available partly on an open-access basis, presents the texts of all his plays, masques, poems, letters and criticism in an interactive digital format, along with hundreds of supporting documents and musical scores and a bibliography.”

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Indiana Jones Had Nothing on the (Real-Life) Monuments Men

Monuments Men

They were “a small group of art professionals, many of them from Ivy League colleges and top U.S. museums, who, in the last days of [World War II] and well after the surrender of Germany, secured and preserved millions of European cultural objects looted by the Nazis and returned them to the nations from which […]

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Why Is Peter Pan Always Played By a Woman?

Mary Martin as Peter Pan

There are certainly teenaged boys who could do it, and J.M. Barrie originally wanted the stage role to be filled by a male. So how did we end up with Mary Martin and Cathy Rigby? A combination of historical happenstance and English labour law.

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