Today’s Top AJBlog Posts 12/18/13

The Ai Weiwei – Olafur Eliasson Collaboration Source: Real Clear Arts | Published on 2013-12-19 Detroit Institute of Arts Comments (sight unseen) on Christie’s Appraisal Report Source: Culturegrrl | Published on 2013-12-18 Breaking: Stolen Strad sells for $2.25 million Source: Slipped Disc | Published on 2013-12-18 Painful Insight Source: Engaging Matters | Published on 2013-12-18  

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Why You Should Read Graphic Novels

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“If you grew up reading comics, perhaps alongside other more “acceptable” forms of reading, then it can come as a great surprise many years later to find that a vast number of people not only haven’t read a graphic novel, but also profess to not know how to.”

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Why Lack Of Diversity Plagues LA Theatre

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“Baby steps” and “elbow grease” were phrases that were resorted to by leaders who would like to be agents of progressive change yet don’t want to be responsible for bringing about the downfall of these “old theaters,” as a panelist called the larger institutions represented here.

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Arts Crowdfunding Is Catching On In Britain

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“Already well established in the US, crowdfunding has begun to establish itself in the UK with beneficial consequences for producers keen to create and promote new shows and for companies struggling to cope with the ever-tightening purse strings of public funding.”

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12 Pivotal Moments in Opera in 2013

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For WQXR, Philadelphia Inquirer critic (and ArtsJournal blogger) David Patrick Stearns cites the Wagner/Verdi/Britten anniversaries (naturally), a thrilling Monteverdian battle, seedy Baroque opera in a strip club burlesque house, and the hot new opera score he stole from the neighbors’ trash.

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Britten in Venice in Moscow

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Countertenor Iestyn Davies writes of his trip to the Russian capital to give special Britten centenary performances of the Canticles and Death in Venice with Ian Bostridge and Gennady Rozhdestvensky (who knew and worked with Britten) to people who had never heard this music before.

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There’s No Such Thing As An Oscar “Snub”

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“There’s no real shortage of pieces about people and films and shows that should have been nominated but weren’t, and those that should have won awards but didn’t. This is something that gets talked about every year. And it needs to stop.” Daniel Carlson explains why.

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Seven Reasons Listicles Capture Our Attention (and Confuse Our Brains)

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Derek Thompson: “Rankings create order where there is chaos. They enumerate the innumerable variety of the world and give us a small sense of mastery over our environment. … They’re also devious in both obvious ways (they can be wrong, and not everything is rank-able) and surprising ways that researchers are only beginning to understand.”

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How Economics Really Got The Nickname “The Dismal Science”

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“The story goes like this: Thomas Carlyle, a Scottish writer and philosopher, called economics ‘the dismal science’ in reference to Thomas Malthus, that lugubrious economist who claimed humanity was trapped in a world where population growth would always strain natural resources and bring widespread misery.” Turns out that what Carlyle was saying was far more […]

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